Tricot 101

Tricot 101

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Knitting tutorial : How to Steek
January 18, 2022

Knitting tutorial : How to Steek

When knitting stranded colorwork (fairisle), it is often easier to knit in the round, always on the right side of the work. It is also easier to read the pattern if you always working in the same direction, knitting on the right side from right to left. This is why the "steeking" technique was invented: to be able to knit in the round (in a tube) and to be able to create an opening (or openings) by cutting the knitting afterwards.   The following video tutorial shows you this technique from start to finish and you will also find under this video the written explanations with illustrations to learn how to prepare the steek before opening and how to cut the knitting!      STEP 1: To make a steek, we will normally increase 5 stitches at the location where the opening will be created later.  These 5 stitches will then be cut in the center and are usually knitted by alternating the 2 colors of your colorwork. In the example below, our steek is composed of a blue, beige, blue (center), beige, blue stitches: STEP 2: After binding-off the stitches, use a yarn slightly smaller than your work yarn and using a hook, secure the center stitch of the steek by poking the hook behind the "left leg" of the stitch to the right of the center stitch and behind the "right leg" of the center stitch (identified in red above). Using your hook, grab and pull the yarn behind these two "legs" as shown below: Repeat all the way to the top to secure the steek opening by pulling one stitch behind each "leg" (shown in red below)... STEP 3: Finish the first side by cutting the yarn and passing the yarn through the last loop (stitch) and then turn the knitting 180 degrees to repeat the same thing on the other side of the center stitch as shown below (identified in pink) STEP 4: When both sides of the center stitch are secured, use a sharp pair of scissors for best precision and cut the middle of the center stitch (bottom up or top down doesn't matter, as long as you make sure to cut the center of the stitch). STEP 5: Once you have cut the steek and opened the fabric, fold the remaining stitches of the steek inside the fabric and secure it with a piece of yarn and a tapestry needle. Have fun working your steek: the technique may scare you the first time but you will see that it is very easy to do! Happy Knitting!!

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Fluo Flow by Joji Locatelli
September 09, 2021

Fluo Flow by Joji Locatelli

  Here is the beautiful Fluo Flow shawl, a design by Joji Locatelli published in Vogue Knitting. The pattern shown above was knitted with several varieties of fingering yarns from our hand-dyed collection!   To make this pattern, here are the yarns and colors used   2 skeins of Bis-Sock Nature 1 skein of Bis-Sock Limette 1 skein of Fizwizbiz Bonbon 1 skein of Fizwizbiz Aqua 1 skein of Sirius Purple 419   Get this pattern published in the Vogue Knitting Late Winter 2020 magazine or directly on the Vogue Knitting website by clicking on the following link FLUO FLOW BY JOJI LOCATELLI. 

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HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN
July 15, 2021

HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN

HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN To substitute the suggested yarn in a knitting pattern, here's what you need to consider: CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ORIGINAL YARN FIBERS: Merino wool, alpaca, cotton, hemp… STYLE: Hairy, woolen, silky, number of ply COLOR TYPE : Solid, striped, gradient, speckled? YARN WEIGHT: Lace, sport, fingering, worsted… LENGTH (YARDAGE) & SKEIN (OR BALL) WEIGHT THE FINAL USE OF KNITWEAR Is it a seasonal garment? Durability (will be worn in shoes?) Softness (worn on the skin or over a sweater?) Maintenance (must be machine washable?) Drape (must be smooth or needs toning). Was the yarn in the original pattern knitted with larger needles than the recommended size to achieve an openwork effect? Stranded colorwork (fairisle) ideal with woolen yarn Must be feltable (choose an untreated wool, i.e. the yarn must not have the mention "superwash") CALCULATION TO SUBSTITUTE THE REQUIRED QUANTITY Here is how to calculate the amount of required yarn when using a different yarn than the one suggested in a knitting pattern. NOTE :  If the yarn specifications are not identified in the pattern, Google and Ravelry.com will always be your best allies!   ORIGINAL YARN SUBSTITUTE YARN Collection Louise Robert Algua Marina Katia Concept Seacell Cotton 70% silk, 30% seacell 250 meters / 100 grams Gauge : 20 to 22 sts = 10 cm Sug needles : 3 / 4 mm 75% cotton, 25% lyocell 120 meters / 50 grams Gauge: 21 sts = 10 cm Sug needles : 3 / 3.5 mm Quantity required to knit the pattern in the chosen size : 5 skeins See the answer below … Calculation of the meters required to knit the pattern : 250 meters x 5 skeins = I need a total of 1250 meters   Calculation of the quantity required in the substitute yarn : 1250 meters ÷ 120 meters = 10.41 rounded to 11 balls   MAKE SURE TO MEET THE SUGGESTED GAUGE SUGGESTED GAUGE 10 STITCHES & 11 ROWS = 10 CM² In most patterns, the number of rows suggested in the gauge is not very important since you can easily add or subtract rows to get the required length. On the other hand, the number of stitches must be the same to get the right knit size (unless you are knitting a shawl or other garment for which the final size is not important) but take note of the following: NOTE: a different gauge could mean that you will use more or less yarn than indicated in the pattern so be sure to take this into consideration!   TO GET THE PRINTABLE VERSION OF THIS POST, CLICK HERE!    

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Comment tricoter une bordure modulaire
June 05, 2020

Comment tricoter une bordure modulaire

Tout d'abord, qu'est-ce que le tricot modulaire? Le tricot modulaire est un tricot composé de plusieurs formes qui s'imbriquent les unes dans les autres pour former une pièce uniforme, un peu à la manière d'un casse-tête! La forme des modules peut être variée: carrée, triangulaire, rectangle, losange (diamant), circulaire, spirale... Toutes les pièces qui se tricotent individuellement pour se greffer les unes aux autres forment un tricot modulaire.  Ci-dessus, le modèle Diamonds Are Girls Best Friends utilise les formes de diamants pour une composition de châle triangulaire: L'utilisation des couleurs aura également un grand impact sur l'aspect final du tricot modulaire. Tricoté en une seule couleur, le "look" du tricot modulaire aura  moins d'effet. La possibilité de jouer avec les couleurs et les textures est souvent ce qui motive la création de tricot modulaires.  Dans le châle Diamond are Girls Best Friends, l'utilisation de la Laine Autorayanteᵐᶜ permet d'obtenir des pointes de diamants qui sont définies par la couleur "Melon d'eau" et il en résulte que chaque pointe est unique! Dans le patron de bas Carousel, on a opté pour une Laine Autorayanteᵐᶜ afin de mettre en relief une spirale qui descend tout le long de la jambe et qui se termine à la pointe du pied: L'entrelac est également une autre forme de tricot modulaire que vous pouvez observer dans le modèle Patron Entrelac version Biscotte Il y a différentes façons de réunir les modules ensemble: on peut joindre les pièces à l'aide d'une couture mais le plus souvent, on le fait de façon instantanée en tricotant les mailles de chaque pièce ensemble pour fermer la ligne de jonction.  Par exemple, le modèle de châle Arc-en-ciel ci-dessous est un châle en forme de croissant sur lequel on a ajouté une bordure tricotée en une longue bande perpendiculaire au châle. Cette bordure modulaire vient se greffer au châle en tricotant la dernière maille des rangs endroits AVEC les mailles du châle... Nous avons le plaisir de vous présenter cette technique à l'aide d'une vidéo préparé par notre professeur Joanne, enseignante tricot dans notre boutique de Saint-Bruno!  Et vous? Avez-vous déjà tenté l'expérience du tricot modulaire?   

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How to knit the pattern no.2 of the Impromptu Shawl knitting game
June 04, 2020

How to knit the pattern no.2 of the Impromptu Shawl knitting game

Here we have compiled the answers to the most frequently asked questions about the Knitting Shawl Game for the Impromptu Shawl pattern: the shawl pattern that knits with playing cards! Discover below the instructions to knit the stitch corresponding to card no.2 in the form of a video... Enjoy! HOW TO KNIT POINT NO.2 - ROW 3 HOT TO KNIT THE POINT NO.2 - ROW 4 A big thank you to Joanne! If you have any questions about any of our knitting patterns, you can always contact us using our CONTACT FORM and select the subject "Knitting patterns". Joanne and our other knitting teachers will be happy to answer your questions!

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How to put a Patch Pocket on a Sweater
October 02, 2019

How to put a Patch Pocket on a Sweater

It's no secret that I love pockets. So with a new cardigan design in the works, it's a not an option whether it'll have pockets or not. It WILL have pockets! In my last blog on pockets I did the Side Seam Pocket. This time I'm going to show you a very easy way to add a Patch Pocket. And don't worry, if you have your sweater knit already and want to add pockets, this technique allows you to do just that! When your cardigan body is complete you will need to size it up to see where you want your pockets to be placed. The best way to do this is to get thread of contrasting color and map it out.  Using my cardigan as an example, I placed the thread 14 rows up from the hem and 8 rows in from the edge over 24 stitches. When choosing the number of stitches that you want, keep in mind what type of edge you want. I used a 2x2 ribbed edge and I also wanted an extra stitch on either end for my selvedge stitch and for it to begin and end the same. Over 24 stitches my pattern was K3, (P2, K2) repeat to last stitch and K1 on the right side and P3, (K2, P2) repeat to last stitch and P1 on the wrong side. Also, I like the size of the pocket! Now that you have your pocket mapped out and it's exactly where you want it, it's time to start picking up stitches. If you put you right hand needle in between 2 stitches you will see a horizontal bar as shown in the picture above. This is where you pick up stitches. The contrasting thread will keep you on the straight and narrow and guide you across to ensure a straight pocket. Place your needle under the bar, wrap your yarn around and pull through the same as you would pick up a stitch anywhere else in your knitting. The picture above shows a couple of stitches picked up. Even with the contrasting thread in place, it can still be easy to grab the wrong horizontal bar so just take your time working your way across. After all the stitches have been picked up, you will be working back and forth to create a flap. My pocket will be in Stockinette with a 2x2 ribbed edge. So after all stitches are picked up I turn and purl across the row. After knitting in Stockinette stitch for the desired length, ending on a purl side, start the ribbing of your choice. As you can see in the picture above I chose to add a button hole. Half way across the row I made a yarn over and purled or knitted 2 together (all depending on where you are in your pattern). Next, attach the sides of the pocket to the sweater using the Mattress stitch. Place contrasting thread before starting to ensure that you are seaming up a straight line if you think you may need it. As you can see in the picture above, besides the bottom edge of the pocket, the sides of the pocket blends seamlessly into the sweater. Pockets and TWEED!!! Two of my favorite ingredients for cozy sweater! I'm using Biscotte's Hagrid yarn in Kalamata and it is AH-MAZING!! And that's how you place a Patch Pocket after your sweater is finished! I think it's a very cool technique! It doesn't use much yarn and usually after a project is finished there's some yarn left so you can add a pocket to any sweater now! Also, you can make the pockets more decorative with cables or different stitch patterns as well. Oh the possibilities!! Have you tried this technique of adding Patch Pockets to a sweater?

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How to Knit Mittens (or Thrummed Mittens)
April 02, 2018

How to Knit Mittens (or Thrummed Mittens)

How to insert your fleece tips (or how to lard) your knitting Larded mittens (or thrummed mittens) originate in the Newfoundland and Labrador region. It is said that sailors who went to sea carried this type of mitts in which small pieces of fiber were inserted. Here are the steps illustrating how to thrum a stitch. Step 1: Detach a piece of the fleece by pulling on it (do not cut with scissors, this would break the tips of your fibers and make the fleece less "hanging" at your stitches). Step 2: Separate the fleece in a width direction to obtain a thinner net. Step 3: Stretch your fleece to check the thickness: it should not be thicker than the wool you knit with. Step 4: Now fold your fleece to form a circle and rub the two ends together by rolling them between your fingers to felt the wool (the fibers will cling and stick to each other. Step 5: Pinching the place where you have closed the circle to prevent it from coming off, cross the circle to form an "8" and roll the center of the "8" between your fingers to felt out the center and fix it in this position. As shown below, to insert the fleece into the stitch, stitch into the stitch below the one you want to thrum. Place the middle of the fleece (center of "8") on the right needle and bring the fleece in front. Now, stitch the stitch on the top (the one that is currently on your left needle) and knit this stitch and then pass the fleece over this new stitch (make sure that your two ends of the fleece are also positioned behind your knitting).   And now, voila!! To put this technique into practice, you will find our free mittens pattern in the knitting patterns section of our site by clicking HERE. Remember that to make mittens, you need a natural wool that has not been treated with "anti-felting". We need the "felting" properties of wool and matching fleece to make strong, durable thrummed mittens. Happy knitting !!

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Knitting charts: tips and tricks
August 19, 2015

Knitting charts: tips and tricks

Knitting charts… They intimidate several knitters! They may seem scary when you look at the sum of these little squares filled with various mystical symbols aligned together... Do not panic : The thing is to get organized ! First, here are the basic rules for reading knitting charts. The knitting charts read the same as you knit: if you knit back and forth you will have to read your rows (odd) from right to left and your rows (even) from left to right. If you knit in the round, you must read your charts from right to left at all times. For stitch patterns charts (and not colorwork charts), squares identified in black (as in the illustration below) or missing squares are missing stitches (either because they were decreased earlier or because they will be increased later.) You must ignore these stitches (they do not exist) and continue with the next square on the chart. Check to see if all the rows are shown on your chart : Some charts show only the even rows and / or odd will tell you to knit the row back and / or even as the stitches appear. This is an important detail !! Easy tips to follow knitting charts Personally I really like working with stitch markers. In the example of the knitting chart shown above, this is a pattern that repeats all around the neck. I will prepare my work by placing a marker between each repetition in the chart. (shown in the illustration below by the red lines.) This way it will be easier for me to read and execute the chart on my row as well as to identify a possible error in my kntting. I do not need to finish the full round before I realize it and undo the complete round to find the error... Secondly, I almost always work my charts with a "Post-it". So I take it off the chart and put it on the next row as the knit moves on. The post-it is also very convenient to write your notes: Legend points illustrated on the chart, number of completed rows, motivational quotes, etc!   In the case of wider charts, you will need a Pattern Holder with a magnetic ruler as this one: Knitter's Pride Pattern Holder. I like to cut the chart into smaller sections for easier reading. Take the following chart for example: Reading each row of 60 stitches can be tedious and we will most likely need to recount our stitches along the way. I suggest you cut out your chart as well: use a red pencil to dissect different sections of your chart and place markers in the same places on your knitting (see illustration below). For stitch pattern charts (and not colorwork charts) be careful not to dissect your chart in the middle of a cable or decrease / increase or you will have to move your marker constantly. Sometimes, simply adding a pencil line without using markers will make reading the chart easier. For example, draw a red line in the middle of the chart for each multiple of 5 stitches. In order to avoid the repetitive comings and goings of your eyes between your chart and your knitting, try to mentally compose yourself a little nursery rhyme. Take the chart below for example: Suppose you have to repeat this pattern 10 times in a row around your work, here is the series you need to memorize for the bottom chart: First row on the bottom of the chart (row 33) : 2-1-5-1-3 … 2-1-5-1-3 … 2-1-5-1-3 … Next row (row 34) : 1-1-1-1-3-1-1-1-2 ... 1-1-1-1-3-1-1-1-2 ... If the series is longer, add to the nursery rhyme this melodious tune eg ("Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"), it will be even easier to remember! The idea is to find tips that help you and make it easier for you to read your charts. Let's try to put these new tricks into practice with few of our knitting patterns: Hat and mittens Nova Scotia Sheeps Jigs and Reels pullover Christmas Socks Happy knitting to all !!

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